Tuesday, 26 October 2021 00:00

If you are one of the many Americans who have to stand all day at work, you may be looking for ways to reduce the strain and pressure your feet and legs have to endure on the job. One of the simplest things you can do is change your position throughout the day. Engage your core and make conscious adjustments to your posture periodically to shift body weight. Find shoes that feel great and support your heels and arches. Custom orthotics created by your podiatrist can further address your specific foot structure and help distribute weight more evenly across your feet. Check with your podiatrist about other techniques to alleviate foot stress while you are on the job and on your feet.

While working on the feet, it is important to take the proper care of them. For more information about working on your feet, contact Pamela Kirby, DPM from Dr. Pamela Kirby P.A.. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Working on Your Feet

Standing on your feet for long periods of time can cause stress and pain in your feet. Your whole body may experience change in terms of posture, back pain, bunions, callouses and or plantar warts. There are ways to avoid these conditions with proper foot care, smart choices and correct posture.

Positive Changes

Negative heeled shoe – Choosing this shoe type places the heel slightly lower than the ball of the foot. These are great for overall foot health. Find shoes that fit you correctly.

Go barefoot – Our feet were not designed to be enclosed for all hours of the day. Try to periodically expose your feet to air.

Eliminate Pain

Foot Exercises – Performing simple exercises, incorporating yoga and doing stretches are beneficial. This will allow increased blood flow to the area and muscles of the foot.

Achilles tendon – Stretching the foot out flat on the floor will relax the calf muscles and tendon. These exercises can be performed almost anywhere. Make sure you add these exercises to your daily regimen. 

With a little bit of this information and knowing more about foot health, you will notice changes. Foot stretches and proper footwear will help with pain and prevent further issues.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Port Orange, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 19 October 2021 00:00

The Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) test is a screening measure that a podiatrist can use to determine a patient’s risk of having peripheral artery disease (PAD). As many as 50% of people who have PAD are asymptomatic. This makes screenings very important for detection, diagnosis, and treatment. During an ABI test, the doctor uses a blood pressure cuff or ultrasound to take your blood pressure at the brachial artery in both upper arms and at the anterior and posterior tibial arteries in both lower legs. The doctor then takes the higher of the two brachial blood pressures and the highest of the anterior or posterior tibial artery blood pressures and compares the two numbers to form a ratio. This ratio correlates to one’s risk of having PAD. A ratio of 1.0-1.4 is considered within the normal range, while a ratio below 0.90 is considered abnormal. It is said that the lower the ratio, the more severe the PAD. For more information about vascular testing, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with Pamela Kirby, DPM from Dr. Pamela Kirby P.A.. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Port Orange, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 18 October 2021 00:00

Fall weather can bring a drop in temperature and sudden, dry air. Combined with a lack of moisture, this can cause your skin to suffer and your feet to become dry.

Treat dry skin and cracked heels with the help of your foot doctor.

Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

The plantar fascia is the band of tissue that run along the bottom of the foot and connects the heel to the toes. When the plantar fascia becomes inflamed or partially torn, it results in the condition that is commonly referred to as plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The pain is usually worse in the morning and after long periods of rest. Common causes of plantar fasciitis includes sitting or standing for long periods of time, having tight calf muscles, having flat feet or high arches, obesity, and arthritis. Patients who are struggling with heel pain should consult with a podiatrist because there are a variety of causes. Once you visit with a podiatrist, they will be able to provide a proper diagnosis, as well as a customized treatment plan for your condition.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Pamela Kirby, DPM  from Dr. Pamela Kirby P.A.. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Port Orange, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis

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